Storytelling Projects

Tendrils

January 2016

mpav This special installation — presented by 100 Story Building in collaboration with artist Joseph O’Farrell (JOF) — will be seen curling its way up through the floor of MPavilion from 4 to 15 January.

What are these coloured wires curling upwards? What are the funny-shaped devices waving from their ends? And what is all the sound coming from them? Scientists have examined these growths and concluded that only people with very sensitive eyes and ears can interpret them. In other words, children.

If you’re curious about the origins of these strange sprouts and would like to help us translate the messages they’re transmitting, join in at one of the Tendrils children’s workshops and write or draw what you hear!

Wild Cards

February-March 2016

wildcards We all play games – board games, card games, running away from zombies games … but have you ever made a game? Making a game is like writing a story where the readers argue with each other and decide what happens. You decide everything: who the characters are, where the story is set, whether everybody makes it to the end of the story, who wins. Join game designer Ben McKenzie and create some games to call your own! Read more about Wild Cards.

Ben McKenzie is the Games Mechanic for Melbourne-based company Pop Up Playground. In his spare time Ben flies through time and space with Susan from Neighbours in the audio series Night Terrace. His favourite dinosaur is Stegosaurus.

Kite Tales

March 2016

kitefest We’re taking to the skies at Darebin Kite Festival! Join us in the storytelling tent to make your very own comic strip tale. Follow the twists and turns of your hero as they journey through their adventure, and then let them fly away on the end of your kite. Our facilitated workshops and installations are designed to draw in and draw out stories, comics and ideas from young visitors to events, festivals or in public spaces.


Early Harvest

July-November 2016

Early_Harvest This dynamic after-school program brings together an editorial board of upper-primary students from Melbourne’s west, and provides them with mentoring and workshops to publish an issue of the yearly literary journal early harvest.

Developed with author and editor Davina Bell (co-founder of harvest magazine) and children’s programming coordinator and illustrator Emma Hewitt, this program is designed to give young writers and illustrators a platform to share their voice, and to give them confidence in their own creative output.

With advice from publishing professionals, students invite submissions, select authors, commission artists, edit stories, create illustration briefs and produce a literary magazine that showcases young, emerging writers alongside popular, award-winning authors and illustrators. The workshops and submission process bring together children from a wide range of backgrounds.

You can savour the delights of early harvest issue 1-3 right now.

Are you a young writer or illustrator and interested in submitting your work to early harvestEmail us!

Opening Up the Trapdoor

June-November 2016Out

A series of teacher professional development workshops run in collaboration with two local schools. This project aims to build capacity for teachers to design and implement their own creative literacy programs in early years classrooms, and to improve reading, writing and numeracy Best Start indicators in the City of Maribyrnong. 100 Story Building will facilitate the co-design, development, implementation and evaluation of a creative literacy project for each school involved through collaborative planning workshops, introductory workshops with both students and teachers and coordination of evaluation activities. This project is run in partnership with Maribyrnong City Council, supported by Department of Education and Training Best Start initiative.

Read the evaluation report here.

Schools within the Maribyrnong municipality are invited to express interest in the project. Contact Lachlann.

Much is written about how the contents of students’ ‘virtual school bags’ can play a powerful role in their learning … about how schools need to become more collaborative learning spaces where children’s diverse interests, backgrounds and identities are nurtured. The In Other Words project provides a template for how these noble aims might be achieved.

– Dr Paul Molyneux, Melbourne Graduate School of Education